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Fyodor Pavlov, Morana
Fyodor Pavlov, Morana
Fyodor Pavlov, Morana
Fyodor Pavlov, Morana

Fyodor Pavlov, Morana

$700.00

Ink and metallic watercolor on cold press watercolor paper
8 x 11”

Shipping will be calculated and invoiced after purchase.

 

Statement from the artist: 

Superstition and fortune go hand in hand - the latter depends on following the tenets of the former. I am Russian, and consider myself a joy-killing skeptic of the supernatural. But superstition is so firmly ingrained in my cultural psyche, that I still knock on wood, loathe discussing success for fear of spoiling it, and comfort myself that breaking a favorite dish will bring good luck. For Russians, superstition was a way to make sense of a cruel climate, to weave paganism into the cloth of Christianity, and to make peace with a healthy if morbid cultural understanding that things might not, actually, turn out alright.
 
Superstition, on the surface, bucks against inevitability. Fortune, on the other hand, relies on it. And yet what unites both these concepts is the cycle of repetition. The wheel of the year, the wheel of history, and the wheel of fortune never stops turning - for better or, like right now, for worse. In that perpetual motion lies both the tragedy and the comfort of change. And so, Morana, the Slavic goddess of death sits upon the wheel, holding up a broken mirror and spinning the thread of fate as the cities and forests burn below, fire rains from the sky and storm clouds gather above. At the hem of her dress is death. But wheat and apples ripen on the sleeves and over her heart. A change will always come, and life is always in the ashes.

This piece is a part of the Superstitions Virtual Group Show. All pieces will be shipped directly from the artists, and we will notify you once they have shipped.